Queens College ranked among America’s ‘Best Value College’

0

NEW YORK – Queens College has been ranked a 2018 America’s Best Value College by Forbes magazine, with special recognition for its success with upward mobility—the percentage of students from the bottom 20% income distribution who reach the top 20% as indicated by their salaries at mid-career.

With an overall showing at 51 out of 300 colleges evaluated, Queens also was ranked fifth among the 35 public and private schools in New York State recognized by Forbes and among the top 25 Best Value public colleges nationwide, according to a press release.

Among colleges in New York State, Queens ranked higher than Barnard, Binghamton, Cornell, and New York University, and placed near the top of all City University of New York schools. Only three schools nationally that ranked higher than Queens College have lower undergraduate resident tuition rates.

“Our inclusion on the Forbes 2018 America’s Best Value Colleges list validates what we have long known about a Queens College education,” said QC President Félix V. Matos Rodríguez. “Its impressive combination of academic excellence and competitive affordability serves as a pathway for exceptionally talented and determined young men and women—many of modest means—toward successful and rewarding futures.”

According to Forbes, only 14% of students pay the full four-year tuition at private schools, while 77% of those attending four-year public schools received some form of financial aid in 2015-16—as did 86% of those who attended private ones.

In the belief that “a high-value education should empower students who don’t already come from wealth,” Forbes identified and ranked its Best Value colleges based on such criteria as net price, net debt, alumni earnings, timely graduation, school quality and access for low-income students—those who are Pell Grant eligible.

Only institutions offering four-year degrees were evaluated; private for-profit schools like University of Phoenix or DeVry University were excluded. For state schools, Forbes used in-state tuition. Learn more about the methodology used here.

Share