New VP of Indian physicians organization in US wants to induct young blood, have bigger voice in national healthcare

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Dr. Suresh Reddy, chairman of Radiology at Hines Medical Center, and associate professor of radiology at Loyola Medical Center, Chicago, was recently elected Vice President of the American Association of Physicians of Indian Origin (AAPI).

Reddy, an interventional neuroradiologist, says his priority is to induct more young physicians into AAPI, the largest ethnic organization of physicians in the country, and to play a bigger role in bringing about changes in healthcare.

He attributed his win in the recently held elections, to unconditional support from his senior mentors and numerous supporters from all across the country, and vowed to work with the executive committee, Board of Trustees, and the membership to take AAPI to even greater heights. “I personally invite you on behalf of Dr. Ajay Lodha, the president of AAPI, to join the upcoming AAPI Convention in Atlantic City June 21-25, to make the organization even stronger,” Reddy said in a statement sent to Desi Talk.

Reddy has served earlier as regional director of AAPI New England; president of Andhra Pradesh medical graduates, and president-elect of Osmania medical alumni. He is also on the executive committee of Indian Medical Association of New England.

“I want AAPI to have a bigger voice in healthcare reform” Reddy told Desi Talk. “There are several ways to do this – most important is to connect with the 2nd and 3rd generation physicians of Indian origin, who have been successful in their own ways.”

Currently, he said, each of them has their own voice and many lead various departments in many states in the country. “I want to connect the docs and unify their voices,” Reddy said.

He said he is also passionate about making AAPI more inclined toward academics. “Our Indian-American doctors have many academic insights and as heads and chiefs of departments, have mentored younger physicians. “We want to provide that networking platform to bring these two together,” the young physicians and the leaders through the many networking events AAPI holds through the year, he said.

Reddy said he is passionate about teaching and mentoring programs for medical students and residents, and has served as the co-chair of the Mentorship Committee in the American Association of Radiologists of Indian Origin (AARI). While at Boston, he won the prestigious annual teaching awards from the Harvard Medical Students and Residents, three times in a row.

As Chief of Interventional Neuroradiology at Beth Israel Medical Center for almost a decade, he had been involved in cutting edge techniques of managing aneurysms and strokes, and procedures on the Spine, e.g. Vertebroplasty / Kyphoplasty in inaccessible regions.

A graduate of the State University of New York, N.Y. and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center / Harvard Medical School, Boston, Mass., Reddy has published numerous journal articles, and been invited to give specialty lectures on the complex procedures he performs.

He has also helped build bridges with other communities of physicians including African Americans, Latino and Hispanic as well as Native American associations, apart from mainstream organizations like the American Medical Association, Reddy said.

At AAPI, he started from its sub-chapter IMANE in New England, 12 years ago, moving up to the Regional Director position for two years, then as chair of two AAPI Committees. He was then elected to the AAPI executive committee as treasurer in 2015, and was the secretary before being elected vice president.

He lives in Chicago with his wife Leela and son Rohun.

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