Indian American-led nonprofit wins ‘Tech Startup of the Year’ award

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(Courtesy: Facebook)

Health4TheWorld, a nonprofit led by Indian American physicians Bhavya Rehani and Ankur Bharija, was named the “Tech Startup of the Year” at the 16th annual American Business Awards.

With a vision to capitalize on the Bay Area’s technological experience to deliver life-saving medical knowledge and resources to underserved communities around the globe, H4TW is among the fastest growing nonprofits today as it has reached more than 3,500 people in 22 countries since its launch last year.

“We are harnessing the power of technology to deliver medical education directly to caregivers in remote parts of the world at little to no cost. With the support of over 100 volunteers, including top medical doctors, engineers, videographers, designers and students, we have developed new tools that are positively impacting lives across the globe,” Rehani, the chief executive of the nonprofit, was quoted saying in a press release.

H4TW’s innovative solutions rely on mobile and web-based applications and use emerging technologies such as 3D animations, machine learning and virtual reality

Its Stroke Mobile Application, in particular, helps patients and families with post-stroke rehabilitation exercises and support by making use of a conversational chatbot, which can be translated into multiple languages, including Spanish, Swahili, Nepali, and Tagalog.

The H4TW Education Platform “Health4TheWorld Academy” is the next thing on the couple’s list as it will represent the largest online education platform that will educate doctors, nurses, healthcare workers and allied healthcare professionals in low-resource settings.

Rehani is an Assistant Professor in Neuroradiology at University of California in San Francisco and was trained at Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, according to H4TW’s website.

She has extensive global health experience as she has been involved in multiple projects in addressing health inequities for over 10 years and is passionate about the application of technological innovation in finding sustainable solutions for global health.

Bharija is a faculty member at Stanford University School of Medicine and he specializes in Geriatric and Palliative Medicine.

He has participated in several global health projects, has mentored multiple physicians in resource-poor settings and is passionate about creating solutions for preventable human suffering associated with aging, advanced illness and health disparities worldwide, according to H4TW’s website.

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